chronicintrovert:

HELLO I AM GIVING AWAY ONE SIGNED COPY OF THE UNCORRECTED US PROOF OF MY DEBUT NOVEL SOLITAIREINTERNATIONAL. REBLOG THIS POST AND FOLLOW ME TO BE IN WITH A CHANCE. THERE IS ALSO A UK COVER GIVEAWAY

WINNER ANNOUNCED SATURDAY 4TH OCTOBER 9PM GMT.

look you can see me in the reflection of my book how fucking cool is that


the-goddamazon:

mirandaadria:

keystonecougar:

cautioncat:

sizvideos:

Video

Okay this is cute.

this is how you prank

THISSSS! Is totally how you prank!!!

Pranks should spread laughter to all in the prank, not cause someone pain and unnecessary stress while you laugh at their expense!



Have some fashion  ||  Yves Saint Laurent s/s 2013 RTW



banderboucher:

it’s not a sunday unless you completely waste it then feel really sad around 8pm


peanutbutterlov-er:

clittyslickers:

very into charts about naps

This is very useful for when I go back to uni.


sterekdestiel:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.

She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.

"No… They don’t, actually."

"And how do you communicate, then?"

"Talking?"

"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"

"It is, sometimes."

"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.

But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”

It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.

i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.

little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

This is absolutely true. I know many Deaf people whose families never learned sign language, and they suffered as a result of it. Some of them even have two language barriers - Spanish to English to ASL (here in Arizona, at least). Many of them have difficulty learning, especially reading. A lot of Deaf high school kids read at a third-grade level. 

I’m Deaf, and I was lucky enough to be born into a Deaf family and I grew up reading a lot, so I was able to pick up the English language easily, and I didn’t have much difficulties in school. 

I was often asked by my classmates for help, especially for math and reading/English, and it would frustrate me. I got tired of being asked all the time for help; even the teachers told the students to ask me. 

But then, I realized that their difficulties weren’t their fault; that it was the fault of their families who aren’t able to communicate with them efficiently, thus isolating them and preventing them from growing mentally. So, I sucked it up and I helped them. 

I help my parents and my sisters with their English all the time. I help out other 50+ year old Deaf people with their English. It gets tiring at times, but it’s something I have to do. They’re not going to find that kind of help elsewhere. 

It is so important for hearing parents to learn ASL if they have Deaf children. Hearing aids/Cochlear Implants isn’t enough. English may be the parents’ primary language, but Deaf children’s primary language is not English. It is ASL.

Deaf children cannot learn to hear, but the parents can learn sign language. 


synchronizedlameness:

guys, you know what this means??

google drive


the-yt-life:

REBLOG IF THERE ARE MORE THAN 2 GENDERS